Culture & History

  • Our Coast’s History: Crew of the Bedfordshire

    A solemn observance held Friday at Ocracoke’s British Cemetery honored the men of the H.M.T. Bedfordshire who died on May 11, 1942, in a World War II battle off the N.C. coast, but a few islanders got to know some of the crew before their deaths.

  • Deserted Island Village to Come Alive Again

    The historic and normally quiet Portsmouth Village will be awash in voices and music later this month as island descendants and others gather for the biennial homecoming celebration.

  • Operation Drum Roll: Ocracoke During WWII

    World War II battles off the N.C. coast were for years kept secret from most of the American public, but Ocracoke residents saw firsthand the horrors of and the U.S. response to the Germans’ deadly Operation Drum Roll.

  • New Painting Brings Surfmen’s History to Life

    The James Melvin painting honoring Capt. Richard Etheridge and his African-American crew of the U.S. Life-Saving Service Station at Pea Island was unveiled Sunday during a special performance of “Freedmen, Surfmen, Heroes” in Manteo.

  • NC Coast Home to Abundant Black History

    Recognizing February as Black History Month, we explore a few of the many sites on the state’s coast where the important contributions African-Americans have made to North Carolina are honored and celebrated.

  • Our Coast’s History: Drawing The Va-NC Line

    The border between North Carolina and Virginia was delineated by an expedition of Virginians led in 1728 by William Byrd II, whose dim view of Tar Heels was made clear in a “secret” history.

  • Birth of Two Inlets: Accounts of 1846 Storm

    Firsthand accounts provide vivid detail of the deadly storm in September 1846 that created Oregon and Hatteras inlets and brought dramatic changes to North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

  • Our Coast’s History: Shell Castle Island

    Shell Castle Island in Ocracoke Inlet wasn’t much more than a cluster of oyster beds, but for a couple decades in early U.S. history, the wharves and warehouses that stood here were the center of maritime trade for northeastern North Carolina.