• Oysters Rockefeller Has Carolina Cousins

    Oysters Rockefeller is a New Orleans dish dating back to the late 1890s, but myriad variations of Antoine’s chef Jules Alciatore’s masterpiece on the half shell are served in eastern North Carolina restaurants.

  • Our Coast’s Food: Holiday Cream Pies

    Made with or without fruit, cream pies are a holiday staple for many families along North Carolina’s coast. Our Liz Biro shares stories from a Portsmouth Island native about Christmastime memories and an aunt’s famous cream pies.

  • Our Coast’s Food: The Best Clam Chowder

    Debate continues regarding the best kind of clam chowder, but on the North Carolina coast, Down East or Hatteras-style clam chowder reigns supreme because it’s made with mostly clams.

  • Event to Celebrate Oysters, Shellfish Growers

    Oyster lovers and others interested in the roles shellfish play in both the environment and the economy, get ready to Shuck, Rattle and Roll, an event Friday highlighting Carteret Community College’s aquaculture program.

  • Our Coast’s Food: The Spots Are Running

    When spots are schooling, from late August to November, coastal folk are known to “fry up a mess of ’em” and enjoy their mild, sweet flavor, a favorite for generations.

  • Our Coast’s Food: Pig Pickin’ Cake

    Our Liz Biro shares her love for the pig pickin’ cake, one of North Carolina’s favorite layer cakes that’s best served chilled, and, since it’s a short list of simple ingredients, a breeze to make.

  • Ten Ways to ‘Mess With’ A Tomato Sandwich

    A white bread tomato sandwich with mayonnaise, salt and pepper could be the official summer food of the N.C. coast, but our Liz Biro offers 10 perfectly acceptable variations on the classic.

  • Our Coast’s Food: Holiday Cheese Ball

    Cheese balls may not immediately come to mind when considering holiday food traditions, but the creamy spheres covered with nuts and served with crackers are a longtime favorite on the North Carolina coast.

  • Our Coast’s Food: Mullet Roe

    An exotic delicacy in many cultures dating back thousands of years and a staple and way of life for North Carolina coastal fishing families since Colonial times, mullet roe has gained new favor among top chefs.